The dirty war against file sharing

October 3, 2013 · Filed Under Civil & Digital Rights, In Depth · Comment 
This entry is part of the series The industry vs. P2P

In Depth - A merciless lens pointed on the hot topics, passionate and detailed retrospectives, reflections beyond the appearances More than four years have passed since the last time Sir Arthur’s Den dealt with the war against digital “piracy” on P2P networks, and in these few years the clash between the contents industry, users and promoters of the aforementioned contents free sharing became worse and worse. The united lobby of MAFIAA (and ideal yet scary fusion of RIAA and MPAA) did its worst by asking for monstrous monetary compensations, by throwing the releasers in jail and by trying to affirm the idea that “crime” against copyright doesn’t pay anymore.

Read more

RIAA’s new year doesn’t start well

January 5, 2009 · Filed Under Civil & Digital Rights, In Depth · Comment 
This entry is part of the series The industry vs. P2P

In Depth - A merciless lens pointed on the hot topics, passionate and detailed retrospectives, reflections beyond the appearancesThe holidays between the end of 2008 and the beginning of 2009 haven’t been particularly pleasant for RIAA and the music majors: the America most hated organization (at least as of Internet) is (supposedly) about to change its legal strategy against file sharing by directly engaging providers, but meanwhile one of these ISP raises a monetary issue that does not promise an easy start for the bizarre joint venture between copyright owners and connectivity providers.

Read more

RIAA’s black days between class actions and noteworthy witnesses

November 22, 2008 · Filed Under Civil & Digital Rights, News · Comment 
This entry is part of the series The industry vs. P2P

News - A succession of fresh, quality news, from inside and outside of the WebThat the legal crusade of USA recording companies against P2P haven’t obtained any practical result until now is an hardly refutable matter of fact. If this wouldn’t be enough RIAA, the well-known labels organization and the most active in the harsh defense of copyright at the cost of repeatedly charging the dead and innocent people, will soon have to face daunting judicial adventures, potentially able to bury the massive lawsuits campaign under accusations of unconstitutionality, conspiracy, abuses, fraud and more.

Read more