Behold the power of nullDC!

October 22, 2010 · Filed Under Babel fish, Emulation & Retrogaming 
This entry is part of the series High-end emulation

Babel fish - A mental interface between Sir Arthur's sensibility and the events from the outer world. And for all the rest, too NullDC, the Dreamcast emulator released with an open source license by its author after years of inactivity, remains a noteworthy example of what kind of results the community devoted to emulating the newest gaming machines can achieve. Although there is wide room for optimization and the implementation of still-lacking features, nullDC is a powerful engine which renders with ease - granted it run on a suitable hardware - several instances of the Sega console at the same time on a single PC.

The experiment was performed by a user of the Emuforums.com board equipped with a six core, 3,2 GHz clocked Phenom II X6 1090T AMD CPU, 8 Gigabytes of DDR3 RAM, ATI Radeon 5850 HD graphic card with 2 Gigabytes of RAM and a Windows 7 64-bit operating system. Running the 1.04r50 beta release of the software, the user “kidaware” used nullDC as a “sort of stress test” for his system by loading 12 different instances of the emulator and recording the following video.

Pretty impressive, isn’t it? Kidaware says that 12 nullDC loaded at the same time eat up “merely” half of the total 8 Gigabytes of available RAM, while all the six cores of the multi-core processor are used up to 99-100%. If this unquestionable demonstration of strength wasn’t enough, the Dreamcast emulator should improve a lot in the upcoming future because drkIIRaziel has recently decided to resume work on his creation. The talented coder says he is particularly interested in porting nullDC on the PlayStation 3, the console which opened the doors to the homebrew development and emulators thanks to PS Jailbreak and subsequent products.

Series Navigation«Dolphin emulates New Super Mario Bros. Wii at 1080pRPCS3 emulates the PS3 on PC. More or less»
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